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Rosy planting tips from the Birmingham Rose Society

published: 03/13/2017

Rosy planting tips from the Birmingham Rose Society

by: Chris VanCleave, Birmingham Rose Society.

Roses come to life at the Birmingham Botanical Gardens Spring Plant Sale. In partnership with the Birmingham Rose Society, The Gardens will once again offer an incredible selection of roses for shoppers to enjoy. Local rosarian Clayton Richard and a team from the Birmingham Rose Society selected varieties for this year's sale. "Today's gardeners are looking for disease resistant/easy care roses. In addition to popular Knockout and Home Run varieties, the Rose Society will offer Hybrid Teas, Floribundas and shrubs from Kordes Roses. Kordes, a rose breeder from Germany has lead the charge on disease resistant roses and if you grow one, you'll see the difference.

There will also be a large assortment of Drift Roses, some great climbers and miniatures. For those who love the romance of the cottage garden, we'll have a selection of Old Garden Roses and a good supply of roses designated Earth Kind. Earth Kind roses have been field tested for disease resistance, drought and pest tolerance and will provide a big color display in your landscape.

Planting & Growing Tips from the Birmingham Rose Society:

Planting Roses

Location Location Location

* Roses need a sunny location (6-8 hrs. of sun daily) and well-draining nutrient rich soil

Plant Well

* Dig a hole as large as the container plus two inches' around.

* Add a mix of garden soil and composted manure.

* Plant covering up to the base of the plant.

* Top dress with mulch.

* Water in.

Rose Care

Roses Are Thirsty

* Water roses deeply once a week if no rain.

An Ounce of Prevention

* Remove diseased leaves and keep rose beds free of fallen debris

* A 2 - 3" layer of mulch will keep down weeds and aid moisture retention

Pruning:

* Prune roses in early spring. Usually around March 1st.

* Prune repeat blooming roses low to encourage new growth and a healthy can structure. We recommend pruning down to 18-24" high.

* Prune once blooming and climbing roses after they have bloomed each spring.

Promote New Blooms

* Deadhead spent blooms on repeat blooming roses throughout the season

* Fertilize after each bloom cycle until September Advocate Good Rose Culture

* Become a member of the Birmingham Rose Society and the American Rose Society With a little care, your roses will bring you great joy for many years to come.

To shop this year's selection, visit the Birmingham Rose Society at Spring Plant Sale. The Sale returns to Brookwood Village April 7-9. On Friday, April 7, public sale hours at 9-7 p.m. On Saturday, April 8, public sale hours are 9-5 p.m. And on Sunday, April 9, public sale hours are 11-3 p.m.



About Birmingham Botanical Gardens

Birmingham Botanical Gardens is Alabama's largest living museum with more than 12,000 different plants in its living collections. The Gardens' 67.5 acres contains more than 25 unique gardens, 30+ works of original outdoor sculpture and miles of serene paths. The Gardens features the largest public horticulture library in the U.S., conservatories, a wildflower garden, two rose gardens, the Southern Living garden, and Japanese Gardens with a traditionally crafted tea house. Education programs run year round and more than 11,000 school children enjoy free science-curriculum based field trips annually. The Gardens is open daily, offering free admission to more than 350,000 yearly visitors.


Spring planting tips from John Floyd

published: 03/10/2017

Spring planting tips from John Floyd

by: John Floyd, Birmingham Botanical Gardens trustee.

Sitting at the desk looking out the window on this bright sunny day, I wonder when our spring garden will occur. Daffodils and Saucer Magnolias were blooming in January, and temperatures were fluctuating from the low teens into the seventies. Quince in full bloom can last for weeks, even with the high/low temperature effect. On the other hand, planted tulips are not so happy with these temperatures, because cold helps buds set on these spring beauties. The landmark of spring is azaleas, and because of our temperatures, I suspect they will bloom early and be subject to being frozen except for the late flowering varieties. Camellias could be into their best season of bloom ever because some selections that started blooming in early January will be followed by the later selections. So we could literally have camellias in bloom for up to five months. Is there anything gardeners can do to ensure theirplants stay healthy and growing in these unusual times? Here are a few tips:

  • Fertilize annuals that are flowering with a water-soluble liquid fertilizer to promote more growth and flowering. Do this every other week at half the recommended strength.
  • Replace damaged annuals with new ones. Pansies, ornamental kales andcabbages are often hurt so much by a quick hard freeze that those planted last fall will not recover. Add new ones where needed or pull the whole planting and replace it.
  • For trees and shrubs that look stressed, check for insects and diseases. Because of a mild winter, many of our insect type friends over wintered. If you are unsure of how to control the problem, visit the Hanna Center on the second floor of the Garden Center building and they can help you.
  • Cut out all dead and unhealthy stems on trees and shrubs that were a result of last fall's drought, many of which are just now showing up. If the pruning of the dead material ruins the look of the tree or shrub, cut it down and remove it from the garden, and plant a new one. A good place to purchase new plants is at Spring Plant Sale April 7-9 at Brookwood Village.

The Sale is open on Friday, April 7 from 9-7 p.m., Saturday, April 8 from 9-5 p.m. and on Sunday, April 9 from 11-3 p.m. Admission is free to the public. Enjoy the warmth of our early spring, but remember the official last frost date for the metro Birmingham area is April 15.



About Birmingham Botanical Gardens

Birmingham Botanical Gardens is Alabama's largest living museum with more than 12,000 different plants in its living collections. The Gardens' 67.5 acres contains more than 25 unique gardens, 30+ works of original outdoor sculpture and miles of serene paths. The Gardens features the largest public horticulture library in the U.S., conservatories, a wildflower garden, two rose gardens, the Southern Living garden, and Japanese Gardens with a traditionally crafted tea house. Education programs run year round and more than 11,000 school children enjoy free science-curriculum based field trips annually. The Gardens is open daily, offering free admission to more than 350,000 yearly visitors.


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